Survey Question Ambiguity: What Exactly Does The Public Support?

CNN Survey Data Analytics: Explaining the Covid-19 Comfort Gap by Political Party

CNN’s June 2020 poll found a huge partisan difference in comfort levels with regular routines due to Covid. But is it partisan or other factors? What can we learn for our organizational surveys.

CNN Proves Conformity Bias — or Sample Bias

CNN’s poll in June 2020 attempted to measure people’s comfort level in returning to their regular routines. However, this poll proves the existence of either sample bias or conformity bias, or both.

Binary Choice Questions: Compelling Findings About the Coronavirus

How a Bad Survey Checklist Question Can Confuse Findings

Checklist questions are one of the more common survey question types, and they are also used heavily in data collection forms, which are a form of survey. And for good reason. You can get specific, actionable answers to a question – if the question is written correctly. A poorly designed checklist question can hide problems and confuse interpretation.

Ambiguous Questions: The Biggest Mistake in Survey Question Writing

Surveys are conducted to learn how some group feels. If the survey questions are flawed, then we don’t learn and may be misled. Ambiguous questions — questions whose phrasing leads to multiple interpretations — are the single biggest mistake made by survey designers. And perhaps a fatal one.

Survey Question Type Choice: More Than One Way to Skin That Importance Cat

Various survey question types can be used to measure something. The choices have trade-offs between analytical usefulness of the data and respondent burden.

The importance of Good Survey Question Wording: Even Pros Make Mistakes

Proper survey question wording is essential to generate valid, meaningful data for organizational decisions. A survey question wording bias will lead to misleading interpretations and bad decisions. Here we examine a Pew survey on use of mobile devices in public settings.

Good question phrasing is an art form, and even the pros can make mistakes. Here we’ll show a question wording bias example from a survey done by Pew Research Center. Ambiguity in question wording likely led to incorrect data and conclusions. It provides some useful lessons for all survey designers.